Add a missing child to CAC-Charities widget

January 20, 2009

 

Child Alert Center Charities  is pleased to announce the availability of a new widget to aid in the search for missing children under the age of eighteen. Parents or Guardians of a child who is missing, abducted or has runaway are urged to fill out the waiver providing us permission to add your child.

Our mission is to raise awareness for all missing children, especially those who may not have been eligible for an AMBER Alert or Missing Child Alert, so you may request to have a child added who has been missing for a while.

  • Print, sign, scan it and email it to contact@callcac.com along with a digital photo or a link to a digital photo we are given permission to download
  • Print, sign and fax it to 435-579-8592  please email a digital photo to contact@callcac.com
  • Print, sign and mail it along with a physical picture.
  • Child Alert Center Charities
    4600 Touchton Road, Suite 1150
    Jacksonville, FL 32246

     Photo Release waiver

    cac-widget

    Related Post: CAC Charities – powered by RadicalBuy


    CAC Charities – powered by RadicalBuy

    January 16, 2009

    There are many ways to sell merchandise online these days, but none as effective as RadicalBuy. It’s easy, it’s fun, and it’s profitable. RadicalBuy combines the aspect of social networking with online commerce creating an effective and easy to use environment to buy and sell merchandise.

    But that isn’t all they do. They have been tireless in their support of our mission to increase public awareness of children reported missing every day in our communities. By providing us with this unique widget parents, friends and others will be aided in the search for their missing children by leveraging the power of the Internet.

    CAC Charities – powered by RadicalBuy

    Using the RadicalBuy e-commerce widget platform, we have teamed up with CAC Charities to bring attention to missing or abducted children through the sharing of this widget. If you have seen any of the children listed, please contact CAC so we can help find them.

    The newly released Child Alert Center Charities widget:

    cac-widget

    View the live       CAC Charities – powered by RadicalBuy

    Child Alert Center Charities RadicalBuy store.


    AMBER Alert Awareness Day

    January 13, 2009

     

    Today, January 13th is AMBER Alert Awareness Day.

    The AMBER Alert™ Program is a voluntary partnership between law-enforcement agencies, broadcasters, transportation agencies, and the wireless industry, to activate an urgent bulletin in the most serious child-abduction cases. The goal of an AMBER Alert is to instantly galvanize the entire community to assist in the search for and the safe recovery of the child.

    The AMBER Alert (America’s Missing: Broadcast Emergency Response) honors the memory Amber Hageman who was murdered after being abducted from her home in 1996. The AMBER Alert became a nationally coordinated effort in 2002. There have been more than 426 AMBER Alert recoveries.

    Though it is often described as a system used to assist in finding missing children, most states only activate them in the case where a child has been abducted.

    The AMBER Alert system began in 1996 when Dallas-Fort Worth broadcasters teamed with local police to develop an early warning system to help find abducted children. The system was created in memory of nine-year-old Amber Hagerman of Arlington, Texas, who was abducted while riding her bicycle and later found murdered. AMBER (America’s Missing: Broadcast Emergency Response) Alerts are emergency messages broadcast when a law enforcement agency determines that a child has been abducted and is in imminent danger. The broadcasts include information about the child and the abductor, including physical descriptions and information about the abductor’s vehicle, which could lead to the child’s recovery.

    What are the criteria for issuing AMBER Alerts?

    Each state AMBER Alert plan has its own criteria for issuing AMBER Alerts. The PROTECT Act, passed in 2003, which established the role of AMBER Alert Coordinator within the Department of Justice (DOJ), calls for DOJ to issue minimum standards or guidelines for AMBER Alerts that states can adopt voluntarily. DOJ’s guidance on criteria for issuing AMBER Alerts is:

    • Law enforcement must confirm that an abduction has taken place
    • The child is at risk of serious injury or death
    • There is sufficient descriptive information of child, captor, or captor’s vehicle to issue an alert
    • The child must be 17 years old or younger


    Profile on CNN Mark Degner and Bryan Hayes

    November 22, 2008
     

    Headline News’ Christi Paul profiles two little boys, Mark Degner and Bryan Hayes, last seen in Jacksonville, Florida, in 2005.

    “Finding the Children”

    Though everyone doesn’t agree with their portrayal, most are thankful their story is being repeated.


    Google is as Google does

    November 21, 2008

    Our thanks go out to Google Inc. for awarding us a Google Grant. As you search the world wide web you may see some of our ad campaigns courtesy of them.

    logo_60wht

    Click on image to view some products

     Click on image to visit our website

     

     

     

     

     

     Click on image to donate


    A new way of networking

    November 12, 2008

    Were you aware how “networked” our households are becoming? As technology is implemented in more and more homes, how will it impact the search for missing children? Please visit and join our social networking sites (facebook and MySpace) dedicated to finding missing or abducted children. If you actively text message then please view missing children Twitter Alerts at our site. Let’s take advantage of technology to aid in raising public awareness.

    Technology ownership by household type

    All adults

    Married with children

    Other household types

    Cellphone in household

    84%

    95%

    80%

     

    Computer in household

    77%

    93%

    71%

     

    At least one household member goes online

    77%

    94%

    71%

     

    Have home broadband connection

    52%

    66%

    47%

     

    How technology affects family communications

    “Have new technologies increased or decreased the quality of your communication with these people?”

     

    Increased

    Decreased

    No difference

    Family members who do not live with you

    53%

    2%

    44%

     

    Members of your household

    47%

    4%

    47%

     

    Friends

    47%

    2%

    49%

     

    Source: Pew Internet & American Life Project Networked Family Survey; margin of error for entire survey is plus or minus 2 percentage points


    New billboard for Mark Degner and Bryan Hayes

    November 4, 2008

    Should you see this donated billboard facing south on the east side of I-95, one mile south of Dunn Avenue  consider thanking Clear Channel Outdoor-Jacksonville Division. Florida Outdoor Advertising Association (FOAA) and the Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE).

    FOAA and its members are long-standing partners with the Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE) and the Missing and Endangered Persons Information Clearinghouse and have provided assistance with donated space on billboards for more than eight years. This generosity by FOAA members has provided a valuable resource to FDLE. As a result of this partnership, FOAA has been appointed to, and has become actively involved in, two FDLE/MEPIC state committees: Missing Children Advisory Board Committee and the AMBER Alert Review Committee. In addition, FOAA members have been providing donated space on traditional billboards for many years with the “Missing Children” public service campaign. Our members play a major role in assisting this state agency in their efforts to locate missing and abducted children.

    In 2006, FOAA and FDLE took this partnership one step further and established the first statewide partnership to raise community awareness for AMBER and Missing Child Alerts by using donated space on digital billboards. This became an additional resource to Florida’s AMBER Plan. There are separate criteria to distinguish between the two Alerts. An AMBER Alert is a higher priority because the child is believed to be in imminent danger of serious bodily injury or death. Missing Child Alerts do not meet the strict criteria for an AMBER Alert activation, but are still a much-needed resource to FDLE and local law enforcement. As a primary member of the FDLE’s distribution list for Alerts, FOAA members are on the front line when it comes to aiding law enforcement.

    Note: The photos are actually age enhanced to age 14 not 16 years of age.